1. thegreenurbanist:

secretrepublic:

Rush Hour…

More enjoyable than if you were in a car. 

    thegreenurbanist:

    secretrepublic:

    Rush Hour…

    More enjoyable than if you were in a car. 

  2. ohhleary:

peterwknox:

good:

Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House
The symbol of American success often involves having the biggest house possible, but our outsized fantasies seem to be shifting. It turns out most of us value nearby stores and parks rather than McMansions. Luckily, that’s probably where we’re headed.
Read it on GOOD→ 

Already there.

Americans want walkable neighborhoods; Republicans want to defund walkability and focus our nation’s transportation program solely on cars.

    ohhleary:

    peterwknox:

    good:

    Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House

    The symbol of American success often involves having the biggest house possible, but our outsized fantasies seem to be shifting. It turns out most of us value nearby stores and parks rather than McMansions. Luckily, that’s probably where we’re headed.

    Read it on GOOD→ 

    Already there.

    Americans want walkable neighborhoods; Republicans want to defund walkability and focus our nation’s transportation program solely on cars.

  3. publicradiointernational:

Carpooling the German way: German commuters connect with each other on a website called Mitfahrgelegenheit to find carpools.
In a parking lot outside of Munich’s main train station, Lars  Biederstedt meets the people he’ll spend the next five to six hours  with. Biederstedt drives from Munich (where he works) to Berlin (where  his parents live) almost every weekend.
Biederstedt never drives to Berlin alone. Instead, he offers seats in his van through the Mitfahrgelegenheit site, one of those wonderfully rich German words that means, essentially, “a lift.”
The site is run by a German company called Carpooling.com, which hopes to provide its services in America.
More at Theworld.org.

    publicradiointernational:

    Carpooling the German way: German commuters connect with each other on a website called Mitfahrgelegenheit to find carpools.

    In a parking lot outside of Munich’s main train station, Lars Biederstedt meets the people he’ll spend the next five to six hours with. Biederstedt drives from Munich (where he works) to Berlin (where his parents live) almost every weekend.

    Biederstedt never drives to Berlin alone. Instead, he offers seats in his van through the Mitfahrgelegenheit site, one of those wonderfully rich German words that means, essentially, “a lift.”

    The site is run by a German company called Carpooling.com, which hopes to provide its services in America.

    More at Theworld.org.

  4. Currently watching Fuel.

    Director Josh Tickell takes us along for his 11 year journey around the world to find solutions to America’s addiction to oil. A shrinking economy, a failing auto industry, rampant unemployment, an out-of-control national debt, and an insatiable demand for energy weigh heavily on all of us. Fuel shows us the way out of the mess we’re in by explaining how to replace every drop of oil we now use, while creating green jobs and keeping our money here at home. The film never dwells on the negative, but instead shows us the easy solutions already within our reach.
    It’s a very good documentary. It really does focus a lot on the solutions to our fossil fuel addiction. Sit down, grab something to do with your hands (like writing emails or knitting or petting your cat) and watch this.
  5. morninghabit:

map by Bill Rankin, 2005-06

    morninghabit:

    map by Bill Rankin, 2005-06

  6. "Effectively addressing climate change will require over the coming decades a fundamental remaking of energy production, transportation and agriculture around the world — the sinews of modern life."
    New York Times journalist John Broder, in his analysis of the recent international climate change negotiations in Durban, South Africa.  (via thegreenurbanist)
  7. thegreenurbanist:

“How can Chicago improve bike infrastructure or make Chicago more bike friendly?
22% said– More courtesy/awareness from both drivers and cyclists
19% said– Build more bike lanes14% said– Fix potholes and resurface the roads13% said– Build divided bike lanes, car-free streets, and other cycling infrastructure12% said– More education for drivers and cyclists5% said–  Harsher penalties for drivers that break the law5% said– “Other” responses like more bike cops, criteriums, Bloomingdale trail completion4% said– Greater bicycle ridership3% said– More bike parking3% said– A more bike friendly CTA 
Bike Fancy statistics & chart

    thegreenurbanist:

    How can Chicago improve bike infrastructure or make Chicago more bike friendly?

    22% said– More courtesy/awareness from both drivers and cyclists

    19% said– Build more bike lanes
    14% said– Fix potholes and resurface the roads
    13% said– Build divided bike lanes, car-free streets, and other cycling infrastructure
    12% said– More education for drivers and cyclists
    5% said–  Harsher penalties for drivers that break the law
    5% said– “Other” responses like more bike cops, criteriums, Bloomingdale trail completion
    4% said– Greater bicycle ridership
    3% said– More bike parking
    3% said– A more bike friendly CTA 

    Bike Fancy statistics & chart

  8. utnereader:

Urban bicycling is generally becoming more popular in American cities,  but there are a few smaller trends that complicate the larger narrative.  A new infographic designed by Bike League for the website Visual.ly breaks down the demographics of bicycle use across the country—and there are a few surprises.
Keep reading …

    utnereader:

    Urban bicycling is generally becoming more popular in American cities, but there are a few smaller trends that complicate the larger narrative. A new infographic designed by Bike League for the website Visual.ly breaks down the demographics of bicycle use across the country—and there are a few surprises.

    Keep reading …

About me

Name: Kat
Occupation: Student, photographer, intern
Appreciates:
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Madison, WI
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I Blog: Anything from the list above, but mainly a smattering of cute animals, environmental stuff, politics, photography, weddings, interior design, cupcakes, books, and whatever else I feel like depending on current events and the availability of new red panda photos.

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