1. thisbigcity:

The energy that comes out of solar panels is renewable, but what about the panels themselves? Today’s leading solar panels owe their high sunlight-to-electricity conversion rates to the use of rare elements, such as indium, gallium and selenium. But if current production trends continue unchecked, supplies of indium in particular will be depleted in less than a decade. The pressure is on to find a way of making solar power even more sustainable. 

    thisbigcity:

    The energy that comes out of solar panels is renewable, but what about the panels themselves? Today’s leading solar panels owe their high sunlight-to-electricity conversion rates to the use of rare elements, such as indium, gallium and selenium. But if current production trends continue unchecked, supplies of indium in particular will be depleted in less than a decade. The pressure is on to find a way of making solar power even more sustainable

  2. publicradiointernational:

Offshore wind turbines. (Photo from Living on Earth.)
Five miles off the southern shore in Nantucket Sound beyond the sun, sand and surf, the wind blows steady and strong. For 10 years this vacation haven has been the scene of a knock-down drag-out fight over siting the nation’s first offshore wind farm. The Cape Wind Project – as it’s called – has come out the winner, having received all of the necessary state and federal approvals. The planned wind farm will spread 130 turbines across 25 miles.
More.

    publicradiointernational:

    Offshore wind turbines. (Photo from Living on Earth.)

    Five miles off the southern shore in Nantucket Sound beyond the sun, sand and surf, the wind blows steady and strong. For 10 years this vacation haven has been the scene of a knock-down drag-out fight over siting the nation’s first offshore wind farm. The Cape Wind Project – as it’s called – has come out the winner, having received all of the necessary state and federal approvals. The planned wind farm will spread 130 turbines across 25 miles.

    More.

  3. climateadaptation:

“The Wild Horse Wind and Solar Facility, located in Central Washington, is Puget Sound Energy’s second wind-powered electric generation facility. Wholly owned by PSE, Wild Horse has the capacity to generate up to 273 megawatts (MW) of electricity. Construction began in October 2005, and was completed in December 2006, with a 22-turbine, 44 MW expansion completed in 2009. According to the American Wind Energy Association, one megawatt of wind power capacity is equal to the electricity needs of 225 to 300 average U.S. homes.”
zenvision:

Wild Horse wind turbines at sunrise by Puget Sound Energy.

    climateadaptation:

    “The Wild Horse Wind and Solar Facility, located in Central Washington, is Puget Sound Energy’s second wind-powered electric generation facility. Wholly owned by PSE, Wild Horse has the capacity to generate up to 273 megawatts (MW) of electricity. Construction began in October 2005, and was completed in December 2006, with a 22-turbine, 44 MW expansion completed in 2009. According to the American Wind Energy Association, one megawatt of wind power capacity is equal to the electricity needs of 225 to 300 average U.S. homes.”

    zenvision:

    Wild Horse wind turbines at sunrise by Puget Sound Energy.

  4. climateadaptation:

Supermoon and wind turbines near Palm Springs, California.

    climateadaptation:

    Supermoon and wind turbines near Palm Springs, California.

  5. latimes:

    Sacrificing the desert to save the Earth: BrightSource Energy’s Ivanpah solar power project will soon be a humming city with 24-hour lighting, a wastewater processing facility and a gas-fired power plant.

    To make room, BrightSource has mowed down a swath of desert plants, displaced dozens of animal species and relocated scores of imperiled desert tortoises, a move that some experts say could kill up to a third of them.

    Environmentalists are torn over the high cost of breaking reliance on fossil fuels. Public comment has been sought, but insiders are calling the shots.

    Read our article here, and be sure to check out the accompanying graphic.

    Images: Top, Artist’s conception of Ivanpah ‘solar farm’ project. Bottom, the impact of a solar farm on desert ecosystems.

  6. Currently watching Fuel.

    Director Josh Tickell takes us along for his 11 year journey around the world to find solutions to America’s addiction to oil. A shrinking economy, a failing auto industry, rampant unemployment, an out-of-control national debt, and an insatiable demand for energy weigh heavily on all of us. Fuel shows us the way out of the mess we’re in by explaining how to replace every drop of oil we now use, while creating green jobs and keeping our money here at home. The film never dwells on the negative, but instead shows us the easy solutions already within our reach.
    It’s a very good documentary. It really does focus a lot on the solutions to our fossil fuel addiction. Sit down, grab something to do with your hands (like writing emails or knitting or petting your cat) and watch this.
  7. climateadaptation:

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

About me

Name: Kat
Occupation: Student, photographer, intern
Appreciates:
Environmentalism
Photography
Conservation
Sustainability
Renewable Energy
Dance
Democracy
Bats
Madison, WI
Environmental Art
Red Pandas
Libraries
Baby Animals
Wisconsin Badger Football
Local Indie Bookstores
Recycling
Broccoli
Weddings
Red velvet cake
Catholicism
Throw Pillows
Social Networking
Foursquare

I Blog: Anything from the list above, but mainly a smattering of cute animals, environmental stuff, politics, photography, weddings, interior design, cupcakes, books, and whatever else I feel like depending on current events and the availability of new red panda photos.

Enjoy.

By the way, if you're on my personal blog and you haven't been to my photography blog, we have a problem.
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A Kat with a Camera.

Thank you.