1. climateadaptation:

Illegal pot farmers destroying public forests, polluting rivers with dangerous pesticides. The farmers are poisoning wildlife, rare trees, and drinking water supplies throughout northern California. 

The marijuana boom that came with the sudden rise of medical cannabis in California has wreaked havoc on the fragile habitats of the North Coast and other parts of California. With little or no oversight, farmers have illegally mowed down timber, graded mountaintops flat for sprawling greenhouses, dispersed poisons and pesticides, drained streams and polluted watersheds. Because marijuana is unregulated in California and illegal under federal law, most growers still operate in the shadows, and scientists have little hard data on their collective effect. But they are getting ever more ugly snapshots.

 Click for solid reporting by the LA Times.

    climateadaptation:

    Illegal pot farmers destroying public forests, polluting rivers with dangerous pesticides. The farmers are poisoning wildlife, rare trees, and drinking water supplies throughout northern California. 

    The marijuana boom that came with the sudden rise of medical cannabis in California has wreaked havoc on the fragile habitats of the North Coast and other parts of California. With little or no oversight, farmers have illegally mowed down timber, graded mountaintops flat for sprawling greenhouses, dispersed poisons and pesticides, drained streams and polluted watersheds.

    Because marijuana is unregulated in California and illegal under federal law, most growers still operate in the shadows, and scientists have little hard data on their collective effect. But they are getting ever more ugly snapshots.

    Click for solid reporting by the LA Times.

  2. utnereader:

    Photographer Mandy Barker collects plastic cast off by the oceans’ massive garbage vortexes and makes beautiful (and, when you think about it, horrifying) art.

    See more …

  3. climateadaptation:

A tale of air pollution. Why do Republicans want air in the U.S. to look like this?
thedailywhat:

A Tale Of Two Countries of the Day: Redditor hayzen77 recently traveled from Australia to China and snapped these “before and after” shots following takeoff and prior to landing.
Surge72 correctly notes that these two photos were taken at varying altitudes, “thereby increasing the contrast between the two photos.” Still, as mikecngan points out, while the comparison may be a bit skewed, “China still sucks”:

[reddit.]

    climateadaptation:

    A tale of air pollution. Why do Republicans want air in the U.S. to look like this?

    thedailywhat:

    A Tale Of Two Countries of the Day: Redditor hayzen77 recently traveled from Australia to China and snapped these “before and after” shots following takeoff and prior to landing.

    Surge72 correctly notes that these two photos were taken at varying altitudes, “thereby increasing the contrast between the two photos.” Still, as mikecngan points out, while the comparison may be a bit skewed, “China still sucks”:

    [reddit.]

  4. ourpresidents:

    The Clean Air Act

    November 15, 1990.  President George Bush signs the Clean Air Act Amendments, deemed to be the most significant environmental legislation ever passed.  The Amendments seek ways to reduce smog and atmospheric pollution, which includes prohibiting the use of leaded gasoline in motor vehicles by the end of 1995.

    These photos are from the Environmental Protection Agency’s project from the 1970s called DOCUMERICA.  The EPA was proposed by President Richard Nixon, and created by executive order in 1970. 

    Hey students! You can create your own DOCUMERICA records for the next generation by entering Documerica.challenge.gov.

  5. climateadaptation:

This is excellent. When you click on a dot, a box opens to the right. You can read about the name of the facility, pollution type, and past violations.


To begin exploring how air pollution may affect your community, use our snazzy interactive map of more than 17,000 facilities that have emitted hazardous chemicals into the air. Color-coded dots and scores of one to five smoke stacks are based on an EPA method of assessing potential health risk in airborne toxins from a given facility. More smoke stack icons signify higher potential risks to human health. Zoom in to your neighborhood by clicking on the map or use the search box to find the area you’re looking for.
Want to know more? Check out our series, “Poisoned Places.”

    climateadaptation:

    This is excellent. When you click on a dot, a box opens to the right. You can read about the name of the facility, pollution type, and past violations.

    To begin exploring how air pollution may affect your community, use our snazzy interactive map of more than 17,000 facilities that have emitted hazardous chemicals into the air. Color-coded dots and scores of one to five smoke stacks are based on an EPA method of assessing potential health risk in airborne toxins from a given facility. More smoke stack icons signify higher potential risks to human health. Zoom in to your neighborhood by clicking on the map or use the search box to find the area you’re looking for.

    Want to know more? Check out our series, “Poisoned Places.

  6. climateadaptation:

    The Cuyahoga River, in Ohio, caught fire dozens of times over a 100 year time period, from 1868 to 1969. Before environmental regulations were signed into law in the 1970s, the oil and gas, chemical, metal, and mining industries dumped toxic waste into the river for decades and decades. Worse, over 35 cities directly dumped sewage into the river for hundreds of years.

    So toxic was the Cuyahoga that it caught on fire countless times to the point it became a joke. The river flowed into Lake Erie, taking toxins and death with it. Nothing could survive in the river, and was considered “legally dead” by the time Nixon signed the EPA into law.

    For more on the Cuyahoga River fires and pollution, click HERE.

    For news on how the river (cleaner, but still polluted) is doing today, click HERE.

  7. climateadaptation:

    I don’t eat shrimp. Ever. Here’s why:

    2 student teams, 2 innovative video reports on shrimp farming — Pace U. on best practices and a prospect for shrimp farmed with the planet in mind and Univ. of British Columbia on pollution, land and water problems in Thai shrimp industry.

  8. climateadaptation:

Big oil spill in China by U.S. company. Looks like China covered-up for a month. Surrounding ocean spoiled.

THIS JUST IN: OIL SATURATES OCEANS, SEAFOOD FOREVER UNEATABLE
The US oil company ConocoPhillips has yet to stem a seeping well that is contaminating China’s Bohai Sea, but it resumed the clear-up operation on Tuesday with a promise that the work will be completed later this month.
The series of slicks, which have spread to about 1,200 square kilometres (460 square miles) since the first leak was discovered on 4 June,  have alarmed environmentalists, fisherman and coastal communities – and  remedial work has been delayed by technical problems and typhoons.
The  Chinese government criticised ConocoPhillips at the weekend for a  laggard response since a previously unreported accumulation of oil-based  drilling mud was discovered on the seabed near the Penglai 19-3  platform B.
The company, which operates the field in partnership  with the China National Offshore Oil Corporation, says it has more than  900 personnel and 30 vessels working on the response, but they had to  suspend the operation when tropical storm Muifa hit the area yesterday.

    climateadaptation:

    Big oil spill in China by U.S. company. Looks like China covered-up for a month. Surrounding ocean spoiled.

    THIS JUST IN: OIL SATURATES OCEANS, SEAFOOD FOREVER UNEATABLE

    The US oil company ConocoPhillips has yet to stem a seeping well that is contaminating China’s Bohai Sea, but it resumed the clear-up operation on Tuesday with a promise that the work will be completed later this month.

    The series of slicks, which have spread to about 1,200 square kilometres (460 square miles) since the first leak was discovered on 4 June, have alarmed environmentalists, fisherman and coastal communities – and remedial work has been delayed by technical problems and typhoons.

    The Chinese government criticised ConocoPhillips at the weekend for a laggard response since a previously unreported accumulation of oil-based drilling mud was discovered on the seabed near the Penglai 19-3 platform B.

    The company, which operates the field in partnership with the China National Offshore Oil Corporation, says it has more than 900 personnel and 30 vessels working on the response, but they had to suspend the operation when tropical storm Muifa hit the area yesterday.

  9. climateadaptation:

July 15, 2011 algae bloom from pollution, Qingdao, Shandong province, China.
See more in the photo gallery at National Geographic
Originally BoingBoing

    climateadaptation:

    July 15, 2011 algae bloom from pollution, Qingdao, Shandong province, China.

    See more in the photo gallery at National Geographic

    Originally BoingBoing

  10. climateadaptation:

31 wild boars found dead on toxic algae beach in France. Caused by millions of tons of farming effluent dumped into ocean. Agriculture lobby denies. Sarkozy taking heat. More here.

    climateadaptation:

    31 wild boars found dead on toxic algae beach in France. Caused by millions of tons of farming effluent dumped into ocean. Agriculture lobby denies. Sarkozy taking heat. More here.

About me

Name: Kat
Occupation: Student, photographer, intern
Appreciates:
Environmentalism
Photography
Conservation
Sustainability
Renewable Energy
Dance
Democracy
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Madison, WI
Environmental Art
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I Blog: Anything from the list above, but mainly a smattering of cute animals, environmental stuff, politics, photography, weddings, interior design, cupcakes, books, and whatever else I feel like depending on current events and the availability of new red panda photos.

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