1. unconsumption:

Despite all our efforts to encourage people to be mindful consumers, buying only what we really need, and buying second-hand at that, and mending/repairing things we already own, Americans still purchase, on average, a new garment every week! And it’s not good quality stuff. Surprisingly little of it gets resold; much of it ends up in landfills or in the hands of textile recyclers. 
A new book, “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,” written by Brooklyn-based journalist Elizabeth Cline, addresses these issues, exploring the rise of fast fashion/disposable clothing and how our consumption of inexpensive clothes impacts society and the environment.
Marketplace reporter Stacey Vanek Smith recently spoke with Cline. An excerpt of that conversation:

Vanek Smith: If someone is maybe interested in changing the way that they shop, what’s a good way to start?
Elizabeth Cline: Well, there are so many different things. Just a handful would be supporting local designers, designers when they are starting up — honestly, they don’t have the capital to produce overseas, so a lot of them are producing in our communities — so support them, help them thrive. I would say also people should use their tailors and their seamstresses in their community, get your shoes repaired, take care of what you own. And lastly, I would say take that $1,100 a year, that American’s spend on average on clothes, and buy less but just invest your money in things that are a little bit better made.

More: The high price of cheap clothing | Marketplace.org
Elizabeth’s blog is on Tumblr here.

    unconsumption:

    Despite all our efforts to encourage people to be mindful consumers, buying only what we really need, and buying second-hand at that, and mending/repairing things we already own, Americans still purchase, on average, a new garment every week! And it’s not good quality stuff. Surprisingly little of it gets resold; much of it ends up in landfills or in the hands of textile recyclers. 

    A new book, “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,” written by Brooklyn-based journalist Elizabeth Cline, addresses these issues, exploring the rise of fast fashion/disposable clothing and how our consumption of inexpensive clothes impacts society and the environment.

    Marketplace reporter Stacey Vanek Smith recently spoke with Cline. An excerpt of that conversation:

    Vanek Smith: If someone is maybe interested in changing the way that they shop, what’s a good way to start?

    Elizabeth Cline: Well, there are so many different things. Just a handful would be supporting local designers, designers when they are starting up — honestly, they don’t have the capital to produce overseas, so a lot of them are producing in our communities — so support them, help them thrive. I would say also people should use their tailors and their seamstresses in their community, get your shoes repaired, take care of what you own. And lastly, I would say take that $1,100 a year, that American’s spend on average on clothes, and buy less but just invest your money in things that are a little bit better made.

    More: The high price of cheap clothing | Marketplace.org

    Elizabeth’s blog is on Tumblr here.

  2. springwise:

Eco fashion store shares full breakdown of its supply chain and costs
In recent times, we’ve seen the fashion industry innovate with products such as biodegradable shoes, as well as charitable initiatives such as Community Collection, which donates a portion of the sale price to good causes. Now Honest by, a brand launched in Belgium this January, has built its whole business around the principle of honesty. READ MORE…

    springwise:

    Eco fashion store shares full breakdown of its supply chain and costs

    In recent times, we’ve seen the fashion industry innovate with products such as biodegradable shoes, as well as charitable initiatives such as Community Collection, which donates a portion of the sale price to good causes. Now Honest by, a brand launched in Belgium this January, has built its whole business around the principle of honesty. READ MORE…

  3. montereybayaquarium:

    Last summer, as part of our “Share the Love” campaign, we transformed the atrium lobby of the Hyatt Regency in San Francisco into an undersea fantasy. For two months, we decorated it with massive vinyl & fabric banners of ocean animals. But as a conservation organization, we didn’t want the banners to be used once and then get recycled or tossed out.

    Enter the creative students at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco.

    They agreed to take the banners and — as a challenge — create eco-fashion and green design works of art. I think you’ll agree: The results are impressive.

    You can learn more about the art students’ project, and vote online (through January 31) at the SFGate website for your favorite design.

  4. photojojo:

    We’ve heard of Photoshop by Adobe, but have you heard of Fotoshop by Adobé?

    It’ll make your skin sparkle.

    Fotoshop by Adobé WILL Make You Perfect

  5. unconsumption:

At Laguna Beach’s 2011 Festival of Arts, a runway fashion show featured designs that festival exhibitors “created from at least 80% reused, recycled or reclaimed materials.”

Artist Brad Elsberry won the first prize of $1,000 for the second year in a row. His bridal gown and train was made of clear, plastic dry-cleaner bags with a strapless, backless bodice overlaid with “lace” made from white metal hangers. Even the bouquet was recycled — it was fashioned from laundry tickets and receipts.

(via Coastline Pilot; additional photos here)

    unconsumption:

    At Laguna Beach’s 2011 Festival of Arts, a runway fashion show featured designs that festival exhibitors “created from at least 80% reused, recycled or reclaimed materials.”

    Artist Brad Elsberry won the first prize of $1,000 for the second year in a row. His bridal gown and train was made of clear, plastic dry-cleaner bags with a strapless, backless bodice overlaid with “lace” made from white metal hangers. Even the bouquet was recycled — it was fashioned from laundry tickets and receipts.

    (via Coastline Pilot; additional photos here)

  6. fromme-toyou:

“We all get dressed for Bill”
— Anna Wintour 

    fromme-toyou:

    “We all get dressed for Bill

    — Anna Wintour 

  7. fromme-toyou:

“Play it Sam, play… As Time Goes By” 
Rosie Tupper for Katie Ermilio Fall 2011 look book

    fromme-toyou:

    “Play it Sam, play… As Time Goes By” 

    Rosie Tupper for Katie Ermilio Fall 2011 look book

  8. photojojo:

    Dress to impress… your photo instructor!

    35mm film jewelry by HappyFactory on Etsy.

  9. unconsumption:


A stunning gown made of recycled shirt collars by Junky Styling. Picture taken at Ethical Fashion Forum booth, London Clothes Show.

(Via Ethical Fashion – What does it mean? x6 | Shirahime - 白姫; photo spotted on Eco-Artware.com’s FB page.)
An online search turned up another picture here of the dress (photo taken in London through the window of Junky Styling’s Brick Lane shop).
Very cool, isn’t it?  

    unconsumption:

    A stunning gown made of recycled shirt collars by Junky Styling. Picture taken at Ethical Fashion Forum booth, London Clothes Show.

    (Via Ethical Fashion – What does it mean? x6 | Shirahime - 白姫; photo spotted on Eco-Artware.com’s FB page.)

    An online search turned up another picture here of the dress (photo taken in London through the window of Junky Styling’s Brick Lane shop).

    Very cool, isn’t it?  

About me

Name: Kat
Occupation: Student, photographer, intern
Appreciates:
Environmentalism
Photography
Conservation
Sustainability
Renewable Energy
Dance
Democracy
Bats
Madison, WI
Environmental Art
Red Pandas
Libraries
Baby Animals
Wisconsin Badger Football
Local Indie Bookstores
Recycling
Broccoli
Weddings
Red velvet cake
Catholicism
Throw Pillows
Social Networking
Foursquare

I Blog: Anything from the list above, but mainly a smattering of cute animals, environmental stuff, politics, photography, weddings, interior design, cupcakes, books, and whatever else I feel like depending on current events and the availability of new red panda photos.

Enjoy.

By the way, if you're on my personal blog and you haven't been to my photography blog, we have a problem.
Please click:
A Kat with a Camera.

Thank you.