1. montereybayaquarium:

    Have you had a chance to stroll through our new plastics gallery in the Open Sea wing? It includes spectacular art installations and photo collages from artists all over the world, created from everyday plastic.

    Enjoy the art—and learn what you can do to reduce plastic use

  2. unconsumption:

Spotted here (shared from original post that didn’t link to a source).
Took a minute to search online for a source, and I found one here, which, um, sells “all you need is less” prints.
{Sigh.} 

    unconsumption:

    Spotted here (shared from original post that didn’t link to a source).

    Took a minute to search online for a source, and I found one here, which, um, sells “all you need is less” prints.

    {Sigh.} 

  3. unconsumption:


The Japanese tradition of kintsugi — the artful repairing of damaged objects — is a practice that continues to fascinate me. In our society today, most things are not repaired if broken.
If a toaster quits working, the normal practice is to throw it away and get a replacement. Still, shoes get repaired. Automobiles do — probably more than we’d like — and iPhones can be repaired if the damage is not severe.
This week’s post looks at things broken, repaired and/or mended — and the beauty of such.

Some pleasant Sunday eye candy at: Accidental Mysteries, 10.07.12: Broken, Repaired & Mended: Observatory: Design Observer

    unconsumption:

    The Japanese tradition of kintsugi — the artful repairing of damaged objects — is a practice that continues to fascinate me. In our society today, most things are not repaired if broken.

    If a toaster quits working, the normal practice is to throw it away and get a replacement. Still, shoes get repaired. Automobiles do — probably more than we’d like — and iPhones can be repaired if the damage is not severe.

    This week’s post looks at things broken, repaired and/or mended — and the beauty of such.

    Some pleasant Sunday eye candy at: Accidental Mysteries, 10.07.12: Broken, Repaired & Mended: Observatory: Design Observer

  4. "Communism failed because it produced too little at too high a cost. But capitalism has failed because it produces too much, shares too little, at too high a cost to our children and grandchildren."
    David Orr
  5. unconsumption:

Reline, a collection of recycled tableware by Anna Borman.
What’s interesting is that the “recycling” happens by simply uniting mismatched (and thus less desirable) pieces into a more desirable collection simply through a graphic element — a bunch of object orphans becomes a family. (Not too far from the Uncollection idea, right?)
Some details:

She set about collecting vintage and antique white porcelain dishes and tea things. She then creates mismatched sets by printing a pink line and recycle symbol on each piece.
“The idea is to reuse and upgrade all the random, left over white porcelain cups and other dishes,” says Bormann. “The simple vertical line is visible from most angles and gives an obvious indication of belonging to the different white set of parts. Once these different individuals are put together they become an original yet completely new tableware set, providing a unique atmosphere to the dinner table.”

More here: ReLine Recycled Tableware by Anna Bormann - Core77

    unconsumption:

    Reline, a collection of recycled tableware by Anna Borman.

    What’s interesting is that the “recycling” happens by simply uniting mismatched (and thus less desirable) pieces into a more desirable collection simply through a graphic element — a bunch of object orphans becomes a family. (Not too far from the Uncollection idea, right?)

    Some details:

    She set about collecting vintage and antique white porcelain dishes and tea things. She then creates mismatched sets by printing a pink line and recycle symbol on each piece.

    “The idea is to reuse and upgrade all the random, left over white porcelain cups and other dishes,” says Bormann. “The simple vertical line is visible from most angles and gives an obvious indication of belonging to the different white set of parts. Once these different individuals are put together they become an original yet completely new tableware set, providing a unique atmosphere to the dinner table.”

    More here: ReLine Recycled Tableware by Anna Bormann - Core77

  6. unconsumption:

Despite all our efforts to encourage people to be mindful consumers, buying only what we really need, and buying second-hand at that, and mending/repairing things we already own, Americans still purchase, on average, a new garment every week! And it’s not good quality stuff. Surprisingly little of it gets resold; much of it ends up in landfills or in the hands of textile recyclers. 
A new book, “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,” written by Brooklyn-based journalist Elizabeth Cline, addresses these issues, exploring the rise of fast fashion/disposable clothing and how our consumption of inexpensive clothes impacts society and the environment.
Marketplace reporter Stacey Vanek Smith recently spoke with Cline. An excerpt of that conversation:

Vanek Smith: If someone is maybe interested in changing the way that they shop, what’s a good way to start?
Elizabeth Cline: Well, there are so many different things. Just a handful would be supporting local designers, designers when they are starting up — honestly, they don’t have the capital to produce overseas, so a lot of them are producing in our communities — so support them, help them thrive. I would say also people should use their tailors and their seamstresses in their community, get your shoes repaired, take care of what you own. And lastly, I would say take that $1,100 a year, that American’s spend on average on clothes, and buy less but just invest your money in things that are a little bit better made.

More: The high price of cheap clothing | Marketplace.org
Elizabeth’s blog is on Tumblr here.

    unconsumption:

    Despite all our efforts to encourage people to be mindful consumers, buying only what we really need, and buying second-hand at that, and mending/repairing things we already own, Americans still purchase, on average, a new garment every week! And it’s not good quality stuff. Surprisingly little of it gets resold; much of it ends up in landfills or in the hands of textile recyclers. 

    A new book, “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,” written by Brooklyn-based journalist Elizabeth Cline, addresses these issues, exploring the rise of fast fashion/disposable clothing and how our consumption of inexpensive clothes impacts society and the environment.

    Marketplace reporter Stacey Vanek Smith recently spoke with Cline. An excerpt of that conversation:

    Vanek Smith: If someone is maybe interested in changing the way that they shop, what’s a good way to start?

    Elizabeth Cline: Well, there are so many different things. Just a handful would be supporting local designers, designers when they are starting up — honestly, they don’t have the capital to produce overseas, so a lot of them are producing in our communities — so support them, help them thrive. I would say also people should use their tailors and their seamstresses in their community, get your shoes repaired, take care of what you own. And lastly, I would say take that $1,100 a year, that American’s spend on average on clothes, and buy less but just invest your money in things that are a little bit better made.

    More: The high price of cheap clothing | Marketplace.org

    Elizabeth’s blog is on Tumblr here.

  7. unconsumption:


Jessica Wilson shares how to make a fun toy camera with things you can pull from your recycle bin. 

Flashback: Build a Toy Camera from Recycled Materials @Craftzine.com blog

    unconsumption:

    Jessica Wilson shares how to make a fun toy camera with things you can pull from your recycle bin. 

    Flashback: Build a Toy Camera from Recycled Materials @Craftzine.com blog

  8. unconsumption:

Banksy creates a piece in London on the side of an empty building and clearly makes a statement about consumerism.
(via TreeHugger)

    unconsumption:

    Banksy creates a piece in London on the side of an empty building and clearly makes a statement about consumerism.

    (via TreeHugger)

  9. gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Old bike helmets = new planters
(via Ask Umbra: What should I do with my old bike helmet? | Grist. Photo source here.)
Related: From the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute: Answers to “When should I replace my helmet?” here.

    gardensinunexpectedplaces:

    Old bike helmets = new planters

    (via Ask Umbra: What should I do with my old bike helmet? | Grist. Photo source here.)

    Related: From the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute: Answers to “When should I replace my helmet?” here.

  10. obon:

Daily chart: which country consumes the most trees? 

The average American uses the paper equivalent of almost six 40-foot (12-metre) trees a year. In Belgium paper consumption is pushed up by the EU bureaucracy in Brussels.

    obon:

    Daily chart: which country consumes the most trees? 

    The average American uses the paper equivalent of almost six 40-foot (12-metre) trees a year. In Belgium paper consumption is pushed up by the EU bureaucracy in Brussels.

About me

Name: Kat
Occupation: Student, photographer, intern
Appreciates:
Environmentalism
Photography
Conservation
Sustainability
Renewable Energy
Dance
Democracy
Bats
Madison, WI
Environmental Art
Red Pandas
Libraries
Baby Animals
Wisconsin Badger Football
Local Indie Bookstores
Recycling
Broccoli
Weddings
Red velvet cake
Catholicism
Throw Pillows
Social Networking
Foursquare

I Blog: Anything from the list above, but mainly a smattering of cute animals, environmental stuff, politics, photography, weddings, interior design, cupcakes, books, and whatever else I feel like depending on current events and the availability of new red panda photos.

Enjoy.

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Thank you.