1. climateadaptation:

    The world’s most untouched rainforest obliterated for palm oil while the world watches and does nothing. Located in Indonesia, Borneo is the third largest island in the world. It’s home to some of the rarest species on earth, including the pigmy elephant, clouded leopard, and the Sumatran rhinoceros.

    The country is undergoing break-neck economic development, and environmental laws are weak to the point of unenforceability. Palm oil is used in crackers, chocolate, ice cream, pastries, crackers, Nutella, etc.

    More at Yale360. Follow climate adaptation.

  2. mabelmoments:

This mother orangutan and her baby were saved by the animal charity Four Paws from people who are paid to kill them. There are allegations that many palm oil companies in the area of Borneo pay rewards of up to 1m Indonesian rupiah (about £70) for each ape killed. The Four Paws team found the pictured orangutans surrounded by a group of local youths intending to kill them for a bounty. Photograph: Vier Pfoten/Four Paws/Rex

    mabelmoments:

    This mother orangutan and her baby were saved by the animal charity Four Paws from people who are paid to kill them. There are allegations that many palm oil companies in the area of Borneo pay rewards of up to 1m Indonesian rupiah (about £70) for each ape killed. The Four Paws team found the pictured orangutans surrounded by a group of local youths intending to kill them for a bounty. Photograph: Vier Pfoten/Four Paws/Rex

  3. allcreatures:

Photograph: Abdul Hamid Ahmad/AFP/Getty Images
The capture in Borneo last week of Puntung, a female aged between 10 and  12, has raised hopes that it may be possible to pull the Sumatran rhino  back from the brink of extinction. Puntung is to be paired with Tam, a  lone captive male, at the Tabin wildlife reserve in Sabah, north Borneo.  It is hoped that a relationship between the two Sumatran rhinos, a  notoriously solitary species, will blossom and the couple will breed,  thus helping to reinvigorate the animal’s dwindling population. “This is  now the very last chance to save this species, one of the most ancient  forms of mammal,” said Laurentius Ambu, director of the Sabah wildlife  department.

    allcreatures:

    Photograph: Abdul Hamid Ahmad/AFP/Getty Images

    The capture in Borneo last week of Puntung, a female aged between 10 and 12, has raised hopes that it may be possible to pull the Sumatran rhino back from the brink of extinction. Puntung is to be paired with Tam, a lone captive male, at the Tabin wildlife reserve in Sabah, north Borneo. It is hoped that a relationship between the two Sumatran rhinos, a notoriously solitary species, will blossom and the couple will breed, thus helping to reinvigorate the animal’s dwindling population. “This is now the very last chance to save this species, one of the most ancient forms of mammal,” said Laurentius Ambu, director of the Sabah wildlife department.

About me

Name: Kat
Occupation: Student, photographer, intern
Appreciates:
Environmentalism
Photography
Conservation
Sustainability
Renewable Energy
Dance
Democracy
Bats
Madison, WI
Environmental Art
Red Pandas
Libraries
Baby Animals
Wisconsin Badger Football
Local Indie Bookstores
Recycling
Broccoli
Weddings
Red velvet cake
Catholicism
Throw Pillows
Social Networking
Foursquare

I Blog: Anything from the list above, but mainly a smattering of cute animals, environmental stuff, politics, photography, weddings, interior design, cupcakes, books, and whatever else I feel like depending on current events and the availability of new red panda photos.

Enjoy.

By the way, if you're on my personal blog and you haven't been to my photography blog, we have a problem.
Please click:
A Kat with a Camera.

Thank you.